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260 Remington Vs. 6.5 Creedmoor – The Key Power Of A Rifle

260 Remington and 6.5 Creedmoor are two common cartridges used for rifles.

Both these bullets have the same 6.5 mm diameter in the round, which typically accommodate with the .308 Winchester rifles. The firearm community believes in the quality of both of these bullets.

So which is better, 260 Remington vs. 6.5 Creedmoor?

To answer this question, we need to look into both cartridges carefully, so let check out our analysis of these two fantastic bullets below.


The Differences Between .260 Remington and 6.5 Creedmoor

The Design and Quality Difference

Both bullets have 6.5 diameters, but the 6.5 Creedmoor has a smaller case size than that of the 260 Remington.

Otherwise, both these cartridges have long and thin shapes; but the 260 Remington is longer than 6.5 Creedmoor (about 0.025 in).

.260-Remington

Although the weight of the two bullets is similar (120gr), the brass of the 6.5 Creedmoor has a lower quality than the brass in 260 Remington. The quality of brass will affect the durability of bullets.

We have a test about the sustainability, and the 260 Remington is the winner.

Nowadays it’s not easy to buy the 260 Remington because this cartridge is a classic model, not many manufacturers make it. You will have to spend a lot of money and efforts to buy the 260 Remington while many manufacturers still produce 6.5 Creedmoor.

This scarcity of 260 Remington can be explained with the quality of brass mentioned above. It costs twice as much as the Creedmoor to make a Remington, so of course, the producers don’t want it at all.

The Performance Difference

After some experiments, we have some comments about these two bullets on accuracy and strength.

The .260 Remington and 6.5mm Creedmoor are almost identical, but the Creedmoor can have a higher load pressure than the .260 Remington.

The high-pressure load can make the Creedmoor create more power than the .260 Remington.

The .260 Remington is faster than Creedmoor because it has a higher case capacity. In the battlefield, the speed is essential.

6.5-Creedmoor

We had a test for the accuracy of these two bullets with the range of 1000 yards.

And the result was great. The accuracy of .260 Remington and 6.5mm Creedmoor is similar. Therefore, the precision of both these cartridges will depend only on your skills.

If you are a good shooter, then you don’t need to care about which bullets you use to have better accuracy.

However, there is a difference between .260 Remington and 6.5mm Creedmoor in the distance they could reach.

While the Creedmore can easily reach up to 1000 yards, the Remington can only reach the distance of 800-900 yards. Therefore, the sniper shooter prefers Creedmoor as it suits long-distance shooting.

In the army, they prefer to use the 6.5mm Creedmoor to the Remington. They claim that the Creedmoor not only has a great long-distance shooting but also has an excellent ability to avoid wind resistance. A bullet that has high-distance shooting capacity and less wind drift will be more effective.

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Which Is Better? - Individual Opinion

From my point of view, I think you should select the 6.5 mm Creedmoor instead of the .260 Remington

You may ask why you suggest that?

First, the 6.5mm Creedmoor is more modern than the Remington as the Creedmoor was produced after the .260 Remington 10 years. The weapons nowadays are usually using the Creedmoor instead of the Remington.

Although .260 Remington has more brass and a little higher durability, I think it’s doesn’t matter. The Creedmore is lighter and can target a higher distance.

260-remington-and-6-5-creedmoor

Otherwise, you can find 6.5mm Creedmoor easier on the market as there are many manufacturers prefer to produce these cartridges.

One thing that you may know: the brass in the 6.5mm Creedmoor is softer than that of the Remington, so this cartridge doesn’t have high durability.  However, the soft brass in 6.5 Creedmoor is the reason why it can reach long distances.

Another thing is that the 6.5 Creedmoor can be suitable for modern weapons, which are usually automatic-reloaded, so it will be more convenient for the shooter.

But if you are a shooter experienced in loading and setting up the gun, or love the classical beauty; then the .260 Remington is better for you.

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Wrapping Up

From all the information above, we hope that you have enough information to distinguish the differences between .260 Remington vs. 6.5mm Creedmoor.

If you find this article useful, please share it in social media with your friends who have the same hobby with you.

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Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 2 comments
Alastair Luckham - October 29, 2019

Hi Jerry
I wish there was some consistency concerning the abilities of the 260 Rem. Loads of articles on the internet saying the 260 is great at 1000 yds and you say it can only reach 900 with accuracy.
I am lost as to whether I should consider the 260 after reading your article.
1. One version….I have had a 260 custom for a while and love it ! i built it for the 140g amax and it is superb to 1000 and beyond, a stout load of vitavori N560 really works for me .
2. brass is harder to get for a creedmoor, a few 1k matchs have been dominated by a 260
3. The .260 Remington blows .308 out of the water. It has 35% less wind drift and about 10 MOA less drop at 1000 yards than the standard 175-grain M118LR load. Despite a 35-grain deficiency in bullet mass, it has 31% more energy because it loses less along the way due to atmospheric drag, hitting 350 fps faster at 1000 yards.
Many like this reply. I don’t know what to think.
Thanks
Al

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Professor English - November 10, 2019

I could barely get through this article because the grammar was so bad. Where did you learn English, the backwoods of podunkville?

Also, what does the “softness” of the brass have anything to do with long range accuracy?

Why don’t you have someone proofread the next article you write and back up what you say with actual data points? Mr. Luckham here didn’t seem to have any issues providing data points…

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